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bstrauss3

Environmental damage..


Allnighter246

Im not against the idea, but ive never seen silver coins turn brown, and nowhere online can confirm what types of chemicals could cause this too happen.


bstrauss3

Not silver, not since 1965. Copper-nickel clad with a copper core.


idk_01

clorox?


Allnighter246

I guess that could be it. Its from march of this year, so its hard too say. I feel as though its something else, just because wouldn't there be websites and videos showing how those chemical physically alter the coin itself to turn it brown? I could see a coin sitting in chemicals for years or even outside and maybe turning brown. But its the entire coins surface, ridges and all.


Apprehensive-Low-741

environmental damage


Allnighter246

How so? Its from march of this year. What chemicals in nature are you familiar with that makes them turn brown? Ive never seen a brown coin.


Apprehensive-Low-741

nickel turns brown or red brown when it spends time in the ground. " metal detector finds" it dosn't take long but here's the thing there are in infinite number of ways a coin can be damaged. don't worry about what happened to a coin after it was struck... try to explain what point in the minting process this could have happened minting a coin is a repetitive mechanical process that produces predictable results and when one of those steps goes wrong it will also produce predictable results.


Allnighter246

This coin could have been in the ground for 6 months max. If being in the ground caused this to happen to coins, i would have seen alot of brown coins in my life. While its true that any sort of thing could have happened, its highly improbable that could be the answer. If there was some kind of scientific info that explained how it was possible for that too occur, id be glad too read it.


Apprehensive-Low-741

i gave an example, but you missed my point. if it didn't happen in the mint during the minting process, it dosn't matter what caused it. damage is damage there are an infinite number of ways a coin can be damaged if you can explain how and at which point in the minting process it occurred, than you have an error if you can't pinpoint a step in the minting process that this took place than you have 25 cents


Allnighter246

I asked why it's brown. Why take the time to present this info if you don't know, or have an actual educated guess? While there are many ways something can be damaged, there are also chemicals that can be used to create reproducible effects. I have never seen a brown coin like this, and was hoping a coin community on Reddit might have some insight. I couldn't begin to care about the value of the coin, and I didn't inquire about it either. I'd be happy to read about any science that could explain what caused it. If you don't have any, dont worry about it. Im sure someone else would be willing to give some suggestions


Apprehensive-Low-741

I thought you were asking a question about numismatics, from a numismatic stand point your coin is brown because of environmental damage. seems like the question you want answered would be better suited for r/chemistry.


Kitchen-Translator22

Chocolate?


Allnighter246

My phones camera doesnt pickup true colors very well. The quarter is brown like milk chocolate


MurkyAd1004

I have wanted to ask as well....I have 2 of these. Figured it was environmental damage....but who knows.


noob_picker

As others have said. Chemical reaction due to being in some sort of environment after minting. Nickel will turn a copper color when exposed to strong oxidizers (acids or bases). If you wanted to try to reproduce it try one of the ones on the list here: https://chemistrytalk.org/strong-acids-bases/ Could have been done on purpose or by accident.


Allnighter246

Thank you, I always find the best resources when I look in the right places!


Wise-Nefariousness-8

maybe the clerk ate it


Allnighter246

Self checkout robot turds lol