T O P

The Many Names of Deutschland

The Many Names of Deutschland

necroblood999

In dutch we can germany Duitsland


LaBomsch

We called ourselves that way like 500 years ago


Mohuluoji

Wasn't that that Dietsland?


OrangVII

Diets Nuts


hallese

Gött em!


imicnic

Bruce Wayne, please login with your real account


cola_giver

I'm real Brice Waine


Lord0fTheAss

Lmao


GreatRolmops

"Diets" and "Dietsland" actually remained in common use in the Netherlands until around WW2 when the terms became associated with ultranationalism and the NSB.


zertka

I hate that I know this due to hoi4. Thanks bootleg deutsches reich


LaBomsch

It was "Diutschland", Land of the Diutsch (Deutsche/German), however keep in mind that back them, German was all but a centralized language and it definitely could differ from region to region Edit: Diutsch, not Duitsch


Grzechoooo

Weren't the Dutch originally some German bog settlers who revolted and decided to make their own country, with landmills and spice trade?


LaBomsch

Way to generalized, but yes


Grzechoooo

The best kind of correct.


Bhalwuf

Yes


Waramo

Dutch was used for "all german" from the english speakers. Later with nationalism rising and the breaking apart off the HRE, the close ones where still Dutch, and for the others "behind" them there was a new Word: German.


laheyrandy

Nah it was Dietsneyland


stonecoldhammer

500 years ago, 'Diets' and 'Duits' were the same thing. That's why in the Dutch national anthem, which was first published at the end of the 16th century, the founding father of the Netherlands William of Orange proclaims himself to be 'of Diets blood' ('van Duitsen bloed'). Nowadays, 'Diets' is not in use anymore (we call ourselves and our language 'Nederlands'), so a lot of people think nowadays that William proclaims himself to be 'of German blood'.


ericprogramming

Well he did have German blood


Tranqist

They are derived from the same Proto-Germanic word for "people".


PhantomOfTheDopera

Same in South Africa for Afrikaans


Fidelias_Palm

That explains the Japanese word pretty well then I suppose.


TheLesserWeeviI

Eh, close enough.


EarlyDead

Funnily enough Dutch and Deutsch have the same origin. So Dutch would be a better fit for Germany.


IRoadIRunner

And Germans call your country Holland


necroblood999

No they call us Die Niederlande


IRoadIRunner

No we definitely call your country Holland and the people that live there Käsköppe.


necroblood999

Then stop calling us Holland because Holland is a part of the Netherlands but the Netherlands is not a part of Holland


IRoadIRunner

Your reaction is the reason, why we do it.


redditroxar

But Holland is much shorter, more convenient and such a nice [song](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drFsXLChrWc)


necroblood999

... oh forgot to say that the dutch government sent a letter to other nation that sayed that they need to stop calling the Netherlands Holland


DauHoangNguyen1999

Doitsu no kagaku wa sekai ichi


UEO_bambam052604

I didn't expect the Third Reich to show up.


SauronsinofPride

Der Mensch ist böse / Der Mensch ist böse/ Der Mensch muss besser und böser werden/ Der Mensch ist böse./ Der Mensch muss besser und böser werden/ So lehre ich/ Auch den Guten steht ein Edler im Weg/ Und selbst wenn sie ihn einen Guten nennen/ So wollen sie ihn damit bei Seite bringen/ Auch den Guten steht ein Edler im Weg/ Und selbst wenn sie ihn einen Guten nennen/ So wollen sie ihn damit bei Seite bringen/ Der Mensch ist böse/ Der Mensch muss besser und böser werden / Der Mensch ist böse/ Der Mensch muss besser und böser werden / Der Mensch ist böse/ Der Mensch muss besser und böser werden/ Der Mensch


Endershipmaster2

Deutsche wissenscahft ist der beste die welt


Sir_Mr_Galahad

Nobody expects the Third Reich!!


TheSourFish

日本人ですか


Koligt

Mr. Worldwide


dat_WanderingDude

いいえ、日本人ではない。


TheSourFish

あー、そうですか


dat_WanderingDude

日本語も分からない。


gl00mybear

日本語ってなに?


TheZarcFiles

学生ですが。


Kowotora

日本語お上手ですね!


NukaDaddy69

You utter fool! German science is ze greatest in ze vorld!


Deblebsgonnagetyou

BBBBBBBBRRRRAKA MONO GA


Foxyfox-

B-b-b-b-b-bakamono ga!


DeliriousTiberius

ジョジョ!


Culsandar

gesundheit


BNVDES

lmaoooooo


subid0

Hold on. Is this a motherfucking JoJo reference?


BNVDES

NIGERUNDAYOOOOOOOOO


Brawldud

is this about their science or their chemistry


bunnywithahammer

South slavs call Germans "Njemci". Nijem, or nem in Serbian is a word describing someone who is mute*, or someone you can't understand. Basically translated it means "people I don't understand" edit: not deaf, but mute. couldn't remember the word


TheOneThatCantSpell

Same here in poland. It's "Niemcy", where "niemy" is a word describing someone mute.


Black_Quesadilla

Also true for Russia: Немец as single, немцы as plural, also from word describing mute, as they didn't speak languages other than german. Seems that all the slavs share this


Polyus_HK

As a beginning Russian learner I was wondering where Германия/Немец came from. Edit: actually, when I think about it, that only answers half the question. Why are there two words for Germany in Russian, one for the country and the other for the people/adjective/language?


Black_Quesadilla

Glad to hear that, and good luck with your learning! If you want to know a bit more, earlier the word Немец meant just every foreigner for the said reason, in medieval and early Imperial Russia there were special districts in which invited foreign merchants and craftsmen lived, it was called Немецкая слобода ("muted" district"). All sorts of people lived there, but most of them were germans, hence the current meaning of немцы


RU_PATSAN

Немец - from word немой (mute; cannot talk) because in Russiа them times nobody know theyr language


RU_PATSAN

Ты ещё не упомянул формы различных падежей


Black_Quesadilla

Верно, но здесь это только бы перегружало, со временем товарищ изучающий русский сам до этого дойдёт


FellafromPrague

Same in Czech, Germans are Němci, němý means mute.


cprenaissanceman

Germany: and I took that personally


TheBlueWizardo

Not deaf. Mute.


bunnywithahammer

you are right, couldn't remember the word "mute".


goingtoclowncollege

I know it's most likely cause they weren't Slavic speakers but I like thinking it's just cause Germans are so stoic


GrandMoffTarkan

From [Wikipedia](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavs_(ethnonym)): The Slavic autonym \*Slověninъ is usually considered a derivation from slovo "word", originally denoting "people who speak (the same language)", So it makes sense the other people would be non-talkers.


mafinam

as a serb we do call it Nemačka, but we do use "Nemci" as our word for "Germans" ("Nemac" for "German")


DerReudenboy

I hungarian it's nemet


bunnywithahammer

i think we Slavs are the only ones that call Hungary closer to your actual name. We call it Mađarska, it reads something like Magyarska


DerReudenboy

Hungarian in hungarian is magyar


HellDwellerGigi

Nah. "Vugoryja/Vjengryja"(Madzjaryja's not used anymore) in Belarusian. "Угорщина"[Ugorshina] in Ukrainian. "Węgry" in Polish. "Унгария"[Ungariya] in Bulgarian. "Унгарија"[Ungariya] in Macedonian. "Венгрия"[Viengrija] in russian.


bunnywithahammer

How about Croatia, Slovenia, Serbia, Bosnia and Montenegro?


HellDwellerGigi

Yep, they do call it that way, thus, only half of Slavs call Hungary Madarska/Magyrya. I'm not trying to say that you're wrong, I'm just saying that you're only half right.


hammile

Ukrainian has word close to *Magyarország*: [*Madjarščyna*](https://slovnyk.me/dict/holoskevych/Мадярщина) where *Madjar* + *ščyna* (suffix for lands) but it is not official, and rare in using.


JoemamaObama123456

Turks say macaristan


Ragloph

It's spelled német, just to be more precise, and AFAIK we actually got it from slavic languages, along with the word néma which means mute. Edit: Germany is Németország, german is német.


DerReudenboy

I am not Hungarian I just know a few words.


Buselmann

Lol that's hilarious


darps

Hah, I love that. "Those people there. They're mute." "They're mute? Like, all of them??" "Yeah. Well, they might as well be."


BoltgunOnHisHip

There's an old joke about a European explorer in Australia who hires a native guide to take him down the coast. They come across a heard of kangaroos and the explorer asks his guide "What are those?" The guide answers "Kangaroo." Which means "I don't know" in the local language. It's not true, but it's funny.


fedorflip

That's also the origin of the word slav - the sl\[o/a\]v root means "word", so a slav, or slavyanin is someone who can speak, as opposed to "mute people", who can't - dunno about other slavic languages, but in russian at least, the word немец used to just mean a foreigner, and later it stuck to germans specifically cuz i guess they're the closest


godspeed_person

there was also theory that slavs calling Germans "Niemcy" and similar may come from "nie my" - not us (our guys) but I think that theory was busted


Grzechoooo

It used to be for all non-Slavs. Unluckily for Germans, they were the main non-Slavs Slavs were dealing with. Similar with Italians in Polish. They're called "Włosi", after "Wołosi", a word used for Romance people (that's where the name Wallachia comes from). Italians were the main Romance people Poles were dealing with, so it stuck.


godspeed_person

quality post over here!


Grzechoooo

Thanks!


_flaccid_pancake

Romanian: neamț for singular, nemți for plural. As a common noun, it doesn't mean anything, so it must be taken from slavic languages


ChristianMonarchist_

In swedish its "Tyskland" I don't know how we got to that


DenLaengstenHat

In OG west germanic, "Deutsch" was something like Thiudisk. Thiudisk -> Tysk isn't too hard to understand. In German it went something like Thiudisk -> Diutisk -> Diutisch -> Deutsch. Ironically, Swedish looks more similar to the original pronunciation.


Der_Dingsbums

Thiudisk is the Volk or the people and it went to something Thiudisklanda Teutschlant Deutschland. Deutschland basiclly means the land of our people. Untill 1901 Teutschland was a correct way to spell it.


DenLaengstenHat

I'm reasonably sure that the Kaiserreich was never called Teutschland in standard German. What are you referring to by "Teutschland"?


Der_Dingsbums

There was no standard german writing untill 1901.


iamyourpathos

Ooh that explains why they're called tedeschi in Italian.


timbit87

Because you have to tsktsk all their shenanigans


Who_said_that_

Funny how the Japanese are closest to what we call ourself


blackcray

The Nordic countries are pretty close, except Finland.


A_random_WWI_soldier

saksa gang ​ also; obligatory torille


Skebaba

Isn't it from the same root as the English term Saxon?


godspeed_person

it's obvious except Finland. as we know they arent nordic and there is no way they can be. they, estonians and hungarians are ugrofin group which comes from lands behind ural as I remember. in super simple words their fathers are mongols that's why their language is so different from ours


GrandMoffTarkan

The friends you make later in life call you by the name you chose, the ones from earlier call you by whatever your embarrassing Latin relatives decided to call you.


Who_said_that_

Lmao


Holiday-Software-322

As a native german speaker from switzerland i know how to say it Düütschland


simanthegratest

As Austrian its definitely Daitschlond/Preissn/Piefkistan


imperialPinking

Bergdeutscher


Background_Brick_898

As a Ostdeutschlander*


Kselli

Oh, ein Schluchtenscheißer!


HoppouChan

Restbayern


raiba91

Ruhe auf den billigen Plätzen in der Ostmark


MTH04

Low German doesn't get enough attention.


Erik_the_Heretic

Nah, they get exactly the right amount.


Holiday-Software-322

I mean ww2 investor


KungXiu

"German"


SomeRandomGuy0307

SHINE BRIGHT LIKE A DOITSU


Marie-Anne-0705

Really? A Hetalia reference?


SomeRandomGuy0307

Yes. I honestly didn't think people would remember.


Marie-Anne-0705

Don't worry. I used to be a Hetalia fan.


hallese

Oh, so not a Rihanna reference?


Marie-Anne-0705

Yeah, that too. But the thing is, it used to be a running joke in the Hetalia fandom.


SomeRandomGuy0307

Yes, yes. The infamous Church of Doitsu. One of the many fanmade gems of the 2006-2015 internet era alongside TF2 Freaks, H*tler Rants Parodies, and Rise of the Brave Tangled Dragons.


Marie-Anne-0705

While I do remember H*tler Rants Parodies and Rise of the Brave Tangled Dragons, what is TF2 Freaks?


SomeRandomGuy0307

Tf2 Freaks were a collection of fanmade characters based on the game Team Fortress 2. From the wiki: https://tf2freakshow.fandom.com/wiki/TF2_Freaks The TF2 Freaks, also known as TF2 Monsters (or GMod Monsters if made only in Garry's Mod) are bizarre creatures with incredible abilities that are made by various YouTube users from all around the world using the Team Fortress 2 models as the base. Some of the more famous Freaks were Painis Cupcake, Christian Brutal Sniper, and Vagineer. I remember there used to be entire YTP quality series about them all over YouTube back in the day. Goes to show you just how awesome and insane the internet used to be.


Marie-Anne-0705

Oh, so they're like fanmade characters in Team Fortress 2. I see. Thanks for the info.


SomeRandomGuy0307

You're welcome. Be forewarned if you end up watching them. They were designed with a very deranged, surreal and mildly offensive sense of humor in mind.


Marie-Anne-0705

I don't mind those kind of humor, but thanks for the warning.


noneOfUrBusines

TBF Japan is the one closest to right.


Mr_Papayahead

prolly because Japan in particular and East Asia in general got familiarised with Deutschland late, when a unified Germany had become a thing.


SeveraTheHarshBitch

no its because they got their knowledge of the outside world from the netherlands who also call the country duitsland


UltimateInferno

No. Japan is the farthest to the left


noneOfUrBusines

Ha ha ha. Good one.


ImNotASwedishBoy

The Doitsu basicly the way Japanese translate Deutsch to their language, it explain why it was written in Katakana (which use to foreign word)


tr4sh_can

Tyskland


Playmoshi124

Tyskland Bottom text


FindusAtor

I agree


Saul_Goodman3

Norsk?


AaroeNielsen

Samme på dansk


tr4sh_can

Close.


Bronyx5735

The joyful consequences of not being united in ONE state for several centuries: other countries name you based on whatever word they have for your people in your language, or whatever tribe of yours was the closest to them.


twork98

The Japanese one is the closest to being correct


Nono9075

>日本人ですか why? I really don't know


twork98

日本人じゃない。でも日本語がすこし話せます。 Doitsu (ドイツ) is the Japanese trying to pronounce the Deutsch in Deutschland. The sounds just don't exist in the language to do it properly. Edit: Didn't translate. "I'm not Japanese. But I do speak a little bit of Japanese."


xForGot10x

THAT'S what it means?! All this time, I thought it meant "which person?" Now I feel like an idiot...


twork98

Haha I can see why you might think that.


subid0

obligatory Nihon-go jouzu


Nono9075

thank you


SapiS68

I'm gonna add one more to the list: Németország.


Malvastor

Hungarian?


ToastedKoppi

I call them 7-1


Affectionate-Class41

r/suddenlycaralho


deathdefyingpig

I love how the Japanese flag looks like a screaming mouth


MaskedTraveller

Niemcy- Poland


Rover_791

BBBBBBAKA MONO GA! DOITSU NO KAGAKU WA SEKAI ICHI


PrayingMantisQueen

I’m Lithuanian. It’s Vokietija.


peet192

In Norwegian we call Germany Tyskland and Greece Hellas


DaSecretPower

Fun fact, Greek and Norwegian are the only European languages that call Greece by its Greek name. Hellenic/Hellas is Greek origin. Greece/Greek is Latin origin.


miscakarza

[Original](https://www.reddit.com/r/countryball_memes/comments/psezfl/the_many_names_of_deutschland/).


Thrusher1337

In a way, it's closer to Deutschland than the rest.


7isagoodletter

Yes I believe that that is the joke


AlexT05_QC

Allemagne


Pichuunnn

In Vietnamese, Germany is called "Đức" (spells similar to"duke") which is just Vietnamese Nom script pronunciation of "Deutsch" Similar to Japanese here whose "Doitsu" is basically katakana version of "Deutsch"


capitantercio

Alemania in Spanish


Ehrenlauch3000

Wir wurden beschworen?


DaSecretPower

In Chinese, Germany is called 德国 "DeGuo", which literally means "Moral country"/"Ethical state" which is kinda funny considering history. The name is a shortened form of the transliteration; 德意志 "DeYiZhi" (from "Deutsch") which together means "moral determination".


Ullyr_Atreides

"Krauts"


somesidecharacter

oh you dont wanna hear our names for the Brits


JunpeiHarry

Brit here. We can take it.


BlitztendoStan

Inselaffe! "Island-Monkey"


ChristianMonarchist_

Best name for the Hun


HackedAccountlol

BASED


sonfoa

I always find it hilarious that people refuse to call a country by the name the locals use so they make up an alternative in their own language.


rewt127

And then you come across Hungary or literally any French speaking country and it all makes sense. Slavic languages are nearly unpronouncable for someone with no experience with them. And French is a fucking mess. "Oh look, that word has 13 consonants and 10 vowles. Aaaaand its 1 syllable long."


Monarch150

French is just a language where every word works like the word "queue"


f33f33nkou

Just dont pronounce any H's or end letters in french and you're already halfway there


RoiDrannoc

What french speaking country have a widely different name that the name it's given in it ?


Shandrahyl

thats cause the "foreign" ppl had this name befor we germans had it ourselfs. the germanic tribes spoke different languages and after the franconians wandered west and started their own language it was kinda messy to define whats "franconian/frankish" and thats why the "diutisc" (old high german for "of the people") was called to those who "still speak the old language". the word changed over the years. Teutsch, Dütsch, etc. etc. "Deutsch" came very late by like the 17th century iirc. by that time the brits still kept their old word of the "germans" -> former germanic. Dutch ppl say "Duit" i think. the Norse say "Tysk". So its all somewhere in the words near the original "diutisc".


_Mega_Weeb_

As an American, I have declared that I will call “Germany” Deutschland.


SilentReavus

I find it amusing how Japan is the closest to how they call themselves


comradecatz

In Arabic its الماني or "almania"


Miserable-Tomatillo4

Let's do this with Italy too and then let's call Poland and ask them how they say "Italia".......


JWSTooth

Włochy!


elder_george

which comes from the Proto-Germanic root "\*walhaz" that ancient Germanic people applied to all their Romanized neighbors (cf. Wales, Walloon, Wallachia, Gaul etc.). Ancestors of Poles learned about Italy from their Germanic neighbors


blackcray

Isn't it also called Saksa in Finnish?


Sir_Keee

Germania, Saxony and Allemani are all historic names for territories that were in what it now Germany, or Deutschland.


ActreDirt

Yes it is


ETHProphet

Japan always being wacky


glizzyMaster108

Don’t forget about Tyskland


RU_PATSAN

Германия🇷🇺🇷🇺🇷🇺


naica22

In Romania we refer ti Germany as Germania, but to Germans as Germani or Nemți and if its made by Germans we say German or Nemțesc


elder_george

Similar in Russian, for example.


HappyAku800

Btw Doitsu in Japanese also means "which one"


kashluk

Doitsu is way better than Saksa, though.


darthzader100

England: Germany Ireland: Gearmáinis Scotland: A 'Ghearmailt Welsh: Yr Almaen French Sounds Intensify


russellbrown2004

I love how in damn near every country balls comic or whatever has the US with the sunglasses


undocumentedmigrant

Vereinigte Staaten Estati Unici Etats Unis And so on


Saiyan-solar

But all those translate to united states or something in the same spirit. Meanwhile Germany has different names that all translate to something entirely different.


pianoman0504

It's different when your country's name is composed of words that exist in the other language and not just some more unique proper name


Teregess

Hungary: Németország (German country) back in than when ww2 happen: 3. Birodalom (third empire) or Náci Németország (Nazi german country)


Iceman_259

Wtf is Tedesco


Striking_Bid_4055

In Danish it’s Tyskland. As far as I can tell it’s derived from the same word as Deutschland but with a pretty big difference in both pronunciation and spelling


Haxxom

Who knows where the name germany came from.


SocialistCoconut

I love this stupid subreddit.