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pugaczalla

If you consider coding, do not do paid bootcamps!! Especially not those that are ‘free’ and you only pay back when you start earning. It isn’t worth the money - all the knowledge you need to become a programmer is completely FREE! If you want to pay, pay for courses on Udemy when they’re on sale, you’ll spend 20$ instead of 2000$ or more. I recommend Zero to Mastery on Udemy for the best return for your money. Mind you that the market is saturated with entry level programmers, so you need to put effort into becoming a good one. Realistically, you need at least 6 months to a year of learning coding and building projects before landing a job. Here are some very good resources to try for free: https://www.freecodecamp.org/ https://www.w3schools.com/ https://www.theodinproject.com/ https://www.mooc.fi/en/#courses I also recommend introduction to Computer Science of your choice on edX or coursera.org and brushing up on your math. Browse through various programming related threads on Reddit, the advice there can be gold. Enjoy the learning process!!


constanceblackwood12

Conversely, if you are not an autodidact, or would benefit from the job-hunting/networking/resume and interview skills/ recognized name brand aspect of a really good boot camp, then yes, it is worth the money.


pugaczalla

True, and the biggest plus of attending the bootcamp for me would be to learn programming in a group setting, group projects reflecting work reality and having your code reviewed by an experienced programmer. You can do that without a bootcamp through networking online and finding projects yourself, but bootcamp will save you a lot of effort and time. I still strongly recommend against an expensive bootcamp for beginners. Try free resources first, you won’t loose money if coding turns out to be not for you.


dimsummer-

Thank you! As the other poster mentioned, the networking/career development aspect of bootcamps is really what appeals to me. But if I decide to go down this route it will be after a LOT of research.


judgemycomposure

If you get into coding and hate it after 5 years you can then probably segue into a Technical Business Analyst, Technical Writing, Project Management, or similar role. It would be a nice blend of the people/admin experience you already have with hands-on tech knowledge. So when you're not sure about what you want to do, the next best decision is choosing something that gives you more options instead of less after having completed it. I'm not saying go for the bootcamp, I'm just saying it doesn't mean you'd be tied to working as a software developer forever. It could just be a stepping stone.


dimsummer-

That's a good point and one of the reasons coding is high on my list of possibilities. It's a lot more flexible than say law or medicine (and of course those careers would require advanced degrees). Thanks also for the reminder that I don't have to be tied forever to whatever I do next. It's easy to put pressure on myself to find 'the one' (the career one, lol). Just a bit daunting to think about starting over in an entry level role in an entirely new sector.


Vaahla

The older I get, the more…resentful I get about the lifetime of “what do you want to be when you grow up?” And “what do you want is a career” because honestly, no one even scratched the surface of the potential jobs growing up. Now is probably a good time to change industries though, before you’re in leadership. You’ll need more experience to switch industries in leadership than you will for an intermediate job right? You can make a better horizontal move now I think. What exactly do you do (don’t actually tell me lol) and figure out how it can fit into another industry. Some of them are easy like accounting, everybody needs accountants. If you were….a social worker, I don’t think you’d have as easy a time moving laterally to a new social worker position, but HR might fit. I had no idea what I wanted as a career, but I picked the part of the work I’ve done that I got the most job satisfaction out of, and I’ve followed that path to new jobs as I narrow down my field. I look for jobs via keywords instead of titles, and I applied to anything that I *felt* qualified for based on the job description. Remember that an interview works both ways, so cast a wide net and see what turns up. You don’t have to accept any job you don’t like, I’ve turned down lots of offers because they wouldn’t improve my situation or my happiness.


dimsummer-

I feel this. My parents both have jobs that are their entire lives and they really pressed the 'you should do what you love' and 'you should be passionate about your job' - which is fine for some, but I will just never feel fulfilled by career so that doesn't work for me. I just want a pretty good salary doing somewhat interesting things on a day to day basis. My current role is somewhere in between accounting and social work on the transferability scale. It could transfer well into the private sector... even if I still didn't like it, at least it would pay better than my current job. part of my problem is that I used to love that my job involved a lot of interaction with people face to face, but now that is all done over Zoom and email (due to pandemic) and I find it so draining.


Vaahla

Working sucks, it’s a necessary evil not one I want to be my entire identity. As I don’t want to live like a savage in the woods, I conform to society. I went into decent paying office work that doesn’t require going back to school (I do have a college diploma which is nice to have but not essential, I’m more formally educated than most people I’ve ever worked with) I picked an internal job because I don’t like interacting with people all that much. I picked an operations based blue collar job because while I don’t want to do manual labour, I do like to be partially active. I probably would have gone to school for engineering if I could have a life do over. The thing is you have noooo idea how many obscure jobs there are on the back end in the industries I’ve worked in. If you want we can chat in more detail and I can suggest some key words to help your job search. I had no idea and I don’t even work for massive companies just small to medium.


NAthrowaway0613

If you like the part of nonprofits where you help people, but HATE the pay you should look at corporations that have corporate social responsibility and foundation jobs. You can work for a Fortune 500 and make actually a good salary and still be helping people


dimsummer-

This is actually my dream role and the one thing I know I'd like (CSR or foundation jobs) - they're just soooo hard to get into, but I'll keep trying :)


cranbog

I wonder how much of what you're feeling is related to your specific organization and not so much that...job title? (Sorry I have a migraine so I might fudge up some words) What I mean by that is, if there is an equivalent to what you do in the corporate world, maybe the switch from nonprofit to corporate would be enough, at least temporarily, to tick some of your boxes. For my field, the corporate world is much faster paced, pays better, and would at least be something different, which can help with some types of burnout. I would consider exploring that, because you'll be able to start with all the experience you've already got, rather than starting lower down in a different field. You could also explore hopping a little bit laterally. Maybe you take on more analysis or more management than you do now, rather than a full career shift. You can get a feel for what that might look like in their job descriptions or asking about it at interviews. You could also just do interviews to get a feel for how things are out there, and using that opportunity to ask questions and see how you'd fit in with your current skill set, without genuinely looking for a new job. The corporate world often is just bigger, too, so you could use your time at work to ask for projects that will baby-step you towards things you enjoy. You'll have more opportunities for specificity than you would in public service or nonprofits, where a lot of people are stretched more thin and tend to wear many, many hats. Edited to add: and if you don't dig the corporate world, consider public service - working for local/state government or its departments - libraries, parks, utilities, etc. It still has that feeling of helping others that a nonprofit would, but isn't corporate. Things are much slower paced usually, which can help some types of burnout. You'll wear many hats, which can help with boredom. But you'll probably get stuck in one position that you ride out until you find a new job or seek promotions (of which there aren't as many to be had as a corporation might).


[deleted]

[удалено]


dimsummer-

This could actually be a great fit! I really don't need to work for a 'sexy' cause or whatever lol. And actually financial inclusion / education is something I'm passionate about. Can I ask what country you're based in? I always thought of credit unions as an American thing but you mention bank holidays so you might be in the UK? (I'm based in the UK).


miloba_

Completely hear you when it comes to being overwhelmed with career options. I made a (relatively minor) career switch myself a few years back, and even then I was overwhelmed. I’ve always loved volunteering - for a while, I considered working at a non-profit myself. However, I’m personally glad that I didn’t. In everything that I’ve heard, the pay and benefits aren’t fantastic, and I’m not ashamed to admit that I wanted to focus on being as financially independent as possible and that money is a driving factor for me in my career. Have you considered making the leap to tech? That’s the industry I work in, and the benefits and pay are highly competitive. I work a regular 9-5, with unlimited sick days, tons of PTO, incredible insurance and other benefits that go beyond my wildest dreams. In order to maintain my love for volunteering, I use my free time after work and during the weekends to give back to my community and volunteer. Edit: I want to clarify this since I’ve been asked before. I have a college degree but no further education beyond that. I do not have coding experience. There are hundreds and hundreds of positions across tech that do not require that you know how to code or have a STEM background. My colleagues and I make 6 figures in our mid 20s and have degrees ranging from English to History to Advertising, to everything in between. Look for positions in marketing, product dev (sounds technical but in some of these positions, you’re not actually building the product, you’re just on a team focused on inbound research and product road mapping), sales, operations. Read the job description and requirements; you’ll be surprised by how technical some positions sound on paper but actually just require years of experience in a relevant field or industry.


pachydermicsequoia

I've been working in a non profit doing community organizing work for the last 6 months. The pay is shit, I don't have health benefits, my boss is an insecure LVM scrote who puts me down constantly, and he lied to me about career progression within the company. Someone else got a higher paying management level job he said was earmarked for me. I dropped down to part time because my mental health was in the tank but I still wanted to do good for the low income members of the organization. I am looking for a career shift, I've had enough. First and foremost, I want good pay and benefits and a better work/life balance. When I was working full time it was 12-9, 5 days a week, plus every other Saturday for half a day. Minimum wage. I don't think this job will get me where I want to go, so I'm considering a switch to a tech career but having a hard time figuring out what I can do. I have an undergraduate degree in economics with little work experience in the tech field. Do you have any tips on how I can break in?


miloba_

Definitely! First off, there are tons of positions at tech companies that directly focus on community engagement and non-profit partnerships, if you’re interested in a position that correlates to your experience exactly. Otherwise, if you’re open to other areas of focus, there’s a lot of potential so long as you have around the years of experience they’re looking for and can tailor your resume to highlight relevant points that correlate to the job description. They might ask for 5-6 years of experience; they’ll consider 4, maybe even 3, if your resume is strong. Some roles will list specific areas of experience (“TV advertising”) whereas others will be vague (“marketing”). Have multiple versions of your resume ready depending on the types of roles you’re targeting. Don’t have one catch all resume, especially if you’re not looking to apply to only one specific role. Lastly, if you know anyone - ANYONE - at any of the tech companies you’re interested in, it’s worth a shot asking for a referral if you’re close enough to that person. Referrals are prioritized higher on the list of candidates compared to a regular applicant. There is no shame getting your foot in through a friend.


pachydermicsequoia

Thank you so much!


dimsummer-

I would actually love to work in tech. I think I have a bit of imposter syndrome though because I keep talking myself out of it because I worry I'm not technical enough, so your comment is really encouraging. My current role in non profits can translate quite well to sales so I'm thinking about going for some tech sales jobs, then once I'm in maybe moving to product or project management in a couple of years. Can I ask how you got your first role in tech with no prior tech experience/education?


miloba_

Queen, you need “grant me the confidence of a mediocre white man” energy! I’ve been an interviewer for the multiple roles I’ve had at my company, and I am truly shocked at how poorly some people handle the interview process. I’m not talking nerves, I’m talking straight out of their ass. It takes 1 or 2 probing questions to make that very obvious 🤣 The fact that you have imposter syndrome and are admitting it indicates to me you’re probably far more qualified than you think. Nearly all of my female colleagues have shared the same concerns with me (funny enough, hardly any men…). Mine ebbs and flows, usually heightened when I take on a new process or switch roles. So your career aspiration is similar to my background! I started off in entry-level marketing, then transferred to product roles after, once I had more experience. I had no foot in the door; I simply applied as a normal applicant for open jobs to help staff a new team. I had no previous tech experience but had around 1-2 years working at ad agencies, so the background helped pique the recruiter’s interest enough to put me through an interview. The interviews are very behavioral and focus more on how you would react or respond to certain situations vs. actually probing about your knowledge about the role or company.


oliverbrown1

How about grant work? I have my own lucrative consulting business working for myself. You can leverage your NP experience.


[deleted]

I changed my career from social worker to programmer at 31. I am self taught and didn’t do a bootcamp. While I miss the helping people aspect of my former career, I have leveled up in literally every other aspect of my life. I’m really, really happy. How I got in: I had left my social work job to be an admin for a small company with a tiny programming department. I excelled at my job for a year and a half while also teaching myself the stack that the programmers use. I advocated for myself to pick up small tasks that the programming could easily offload, like running queries on mySQL. I just took on more of their work over time until it made sense for them to just make me a dev. Eventually they transferred me and I’ve been here since. This won’t work at bigger companies and/or already tech-forward companies because they hire people who already have experience. My company was a essentially a mom and and pop.